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PH Opinion

PH Opinion


Views and comment from Westminster

Nigel Farage: If I were Cameron I would tell Mr Monti to resign

Writing exclusively for PoliticsHome ahead of tomorrow's summit between David Cameron and Mario Monti, UKIP leader Nigel Farage says the Prime Minister should tell his Italian counterpart to resign. Mr Farage says Mr Monti has 'no legitimacy' and describes his appointment as 'an outrage'.

If Mr Cameron were meeting the head of a country in South America where the democratically elected Prime Minister and his cabinet had all been removed and replaced by friends of a powerful elite he'd probably be delivering a message about the importance of democracy with the thoughts of imposing trade sanctions should this rogue government not agree.

Well, Mr Cameron is not going to South America but meeting the Prime Minister of Italy - where the exact same scenario has happened. But the appointees are the leaders of the EU and, as such, there has been no condemnation from world leaders about the actions of late last year.

The EU elites including Commission President Barroso and Council President Herman Van Rompuy – both unelected and unaccountable - decided that Italian Prime Minister Mr Berlusconi had to go. He was removed and replaced by Mr Monti, a former EU Commissioner, a fellow architect of this euro disaster and a man who was not even a member of the Parliament.

Mr Van Rompuy went to Italy and said that this was not a time for elections but a time for actions. What gives him the right to say that to the Italian people? A man who was not elected for the position he now holds clearly views democracy with contempt and Cameron should make his feelings known on this. He should say the opposite to Van Rompuy and insist that there is always time for democracy.

Because, despite the €40bn package of austerity measures, the markets have not calmed down - which was what Mr Monti's appointment was supposed to achieve. And Italian officials do not believe they should be expected to deal with the problems faced by their country entirely on their own.

The Italian minister Corrado Passera said that the Euro would fail unless the European Central Bank was permitted to be a lender of last resort and the 27 nations in the Union came to an agreement on how to shore up the single currency.

“Either Europe should decide to give itself the tools that every currency has, meaning a central bank to guarantee liquidity and stability, or there won't be any growth, there won't be any employment”, he said.

If I were Mr Cameron I would tell Mr Monti to resign. He has no legitimacy, it's an outrage that he's been appointed rather than elected and he's surrounded by a cabinet of technocrats who have no democratic authority as not one single minister was elected.

The Italians may wish for other countries to come to the rescue in their financial plight but they have to understand that they are too big for the rest of Europe to bail them out.  

What Mr Cameron must stress is that we are not a cash cow for failed political projects such as the EU. We have a debt and a deficit at home which needs urgent attention and no money to spare throwing it down the drain of the disasterous single currency.

Because there is always the option of leaving the single currency and bringing back the Lira and staging a competitive devaluation. It's what Greece will certainly need to do and the Bond markets indicate that there's no let up in caution just because a former EU Commissioner has been crow barred into the top job in Rome.

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