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Press Release

Press Releases

Daybreak poll: 58% of people don't trust David Cameron as a leader

Prime Minister David Cameron spoke to Daybreak this morning live from
Manchester at the Conservative Party Conference. He spoke to Aled Jones and
Lorraine Kelly about GP opening hours, school meals for children and
freezing fuel tax as well as responding to the results of a Daybreak and
OnePoll survey which found that 58% of people surveyed don’t trust him as a
leader.
On the new trial where GPs will stay open until 8pm, seven days a week,
David Cameron said:
“I think it is the right approach to look at this because obviously our
Accident and Emergency departments do a brilliant job but they do have four
million more people going through them than was the case in 2004. A lot of
people going to Accident and Emergency really need a GP rather than
Accident and Emergency so I think this pilot scheme of having around the
country GP Surgeries open 12 hours a day, seven days a week is a very good
step forward. A pilot scheme to start with, fully funded, properly funded
by the Government and then we look to rolling it out across the country. I
think it’s a very good idea and it’ll also help hardworking people who
often want to go to see a GP but find it difficult to get off work in order
to do so.”
Responding to results of a Daybreak and OnePoll survey of 1000 people which
found that 60% don’t trust the Conservatives as a party and 58% don’t trust
Cameron as a leader, the Prime Minister said: “We obviously have to win the
trust of the British people, we’ve had to take over these last three years
some very difficult decisions, we’ve had to make very difficult cuts and I
know that sometimes that hasn’t been easy for people. I think we can now
say to the British people though, the economy is turning the corner, the
economy is growing, we’ve created 1.4million private sector jobs, we
haven’t solved the Labour Debt Crisis but we are on our way, we’re paying
down that deficit. Britain is standing tall in the world again but we need
to keep this up and we need to deliver recovery for everybody, for all, for
all parts of the country - north and south, for all people - rich and poor
- and we need to demonstrate that we are doing that so we win people’s
trust.”
When Aled asked why yesterday we were told we’d have “seven more years of
pain”, the Prime Minister responded: “What we’re saying is that in the next
Parliament, we should be targeting to have a surplus rather than a deficit.
Let me explain why this matters so much. Our deficit is the annual
overdraft, if you like, and as long as you have an overdraft you are adding
to the overall stock of debt in the economy. And our debt levels are at a
very high level so as the Chancellor put it yesterday, the last crisis put
us close to the brink. If we had another crisis and we hadn’t got our debt
levels down then that could push us over the brink so this is the
responsible thing to do but because our economy is growing, because we’re
creating jobs, because those jobs are paying taxes, I don’t believe it will
be impossible to achieve this. I think it’s perfectly possible to do and
it’s the right thing to do for the long term health of the country.”
As today's Daybreak and One Poll survey found that 14% of people would like
to see Cameron “do a deal with UKIP”, he responded: “I don’t want to see
deals or pacts, I want to offer people at the next election a strong
Conservative government with a clear mandate to keep on growing our
economy, paying down our deficit, delivering for hardworking people,
delivering the sorts of things we’re talking about today in our health
service. Of course if local UKIP supporters or candidates want to support
the local Conservative candidate because that’s the only way you can be
guaranteed an in out referendum, the only way you can continue with getting
immigration down, the only way you can continue with this vital welfare
reform then of course I’d welcome that.”
And on the freeze on fuel tax for two years, Cameron said the Tories
weren’t borrowing the Labour Party’s ideas: “What we’ve done over this
Parliament wherever we’ve been able to is to remove the planned Labour
increases in petrol duty, to freeze petrol duty and in some occasions to
cut petrol duty because we recognise that for many families it’s
unavoidable to get in the car to do the school run or to get to work or to
visit relatives it’s absolutely vital. So we want to keep those costs down.
We’ve also frozen people’s council tax, we want to get people on the lowest
energy tariffs possible but the real cost of living plan the country needs
is to go on growing the economy, creating jobs, keeping mortgage rates low
because that’s such a huge part of families bills and then crucially to cut
taxes. Now we’ve done all of those four things and we can go on doing those
four things. Cutting people’s taxes is particularly important because by
lifting the first £10,000 that people earn out of taxes, we put more money
in people’s pockets for them to spend as they choose and that is I think
absolutely vital for the future.”
As it’s been reported today that thousands of pupils are going to school
hungry and 85% of teachers are reporting a rise in starving children
turning up to class, Cameron said: “I think it’s really important that we
make sure there’s good nutritious school food and one of the things we’re
doing of course is to make sure that for the first three years of school,
for Reception, for Year 1, for Year 2 that you have school meals for all. I
think that’s a really good way to make sure that children get a good start.
In the latter years, those children whose parents are not well off are to
have free school meals, I think that’s absolutely vital.”
And finally, as Lorraine pointed out that Theresa May could be seen to be
“insensitive” in her choice of designer outfit for yesterday’s speech,
Cameron said: “Theresa May gave a great speech yesterday, I think what
matters are not what Politicians are wearing but the ideas in the head and
the actions that they’re taking and this is a Home Secretary who has cut
immigration, who has cut crime, who got Abu Qatada out of our country and
back to Jordan and I think that’s what matters most of all, not whether
someone chooses to spend their money on shoes or a suit or what have you.
In terms of Minister’s pay, let’s be clear, when I became Prime Minister, I
cut it by 5% and I froze it for the whole of the Parliament. I thought it
was very important to demonstrate that we’re going to cut the cost of our
politics and show that politicians weren’t getting a good deal.”

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