Phi Wire Hand Picked Politics - Live

  • Damian Thompson | Cameron has silenced the only minister who understands Islamism

    • source icon
    • 17:31
  • Deborah Orr | We can refuse to view James Foley's murder, but Isis has stillinfected our minds...

    • source icon
    • 17:00
  • Mehdi Hasan | John Bercow is becoming dangerously outflanked over Commons clerk row

    • source icon
    • 16:52
  • Mark Wallace | Labour win West Midlands PCC by-election on 10.4 per cent turnout

    • source icon
    • 16:50
  • Alex Andreou | How many holidays does David Cameron need? | Alex Andreou

    • source icon
    • 16:50
  • PoliticsHome | Only the latest five entries on the PhiWire are visible to non-subscribers

  • PoliticsHome | Only the latest five entries on the PhiWire are visible to non-subscribers

  • PoliticsHome | Only the latest five entries on the PhiWire are visible to non-subscribers

  • PoliticsHome | Only the latest five entries on the PhiWire are visible to non-subscribers

  • PoliticsHome | Only the latest five entries on the PhiWire are visible to non-subscribers

  • PoliticsHome | Only the latest five entries on the PhiWire are visible to non-subscribers

  • PoliticsHome | Only the latest five entries on the PhiWire are visible to non-subscribers

  • PoliticsHome | Only the latest five entries on the PhiWire are visible to non-subscribers

  • PoliticsHome | Only the latest five entries on the PhiWire are visible to non-subscribers

  • PoliticsHome | Only the latest five entries on the PhiWire are visible to non-subscribers

  • PoliticsHome | Only the latest five entries on the PhiWire are visible to non-subscribers

  • PoliticsHome | Only the latest five entries on the PhiWire are visible to non-subscribers

  • PoliticsHome | Only the latest five entries on the PhiWire are visible to non-subscribers

  • PoliticsHome | Only the latest five entries on the PhiWire are visible to non-subscribers

  • PoliticsHome | Only the latest five entries on the PhiWire are visible to non-subscribers

  • PoliticsHome | Only the latest five entries on the PhiWire are visible to non-subscribers

  • PoliticsHome | Only the latest five entries on the PhiWire are visible to non-subscribers

  • PoliticsHome | Only the latest five entries on the PhiWire are visible to non-subscribers

  • PoliticsHome | Only the latest five entries on the PhiWire are visible to non-subscribers

  • PoliticsHome | Only the latest five entries on the PhiWire are visible to non-subscribers

RSS

Nick Clegg MP

Deputy PM and Lib Dem leader

Green Box: Nick CleggClick to open

Only Recommended
+ Expand all - Collapse all

Stories involving Nick Clegg

Channel 4 announce Clegg movie

The Deputy Prime Minister's life is to be turned into a film.

Channel 4 has announced it will screen a 90-minute-long drama depicting the life of Liberal Democrat leader in Government.

Acclaimed playwright James Graham will pen Coalition, which will depict the negotiations and machination that dominated the early days of the Conservative-Lib Dem Government.

The blurb for the one-off TV show states: “In May 2010, after decades of single party rule and amidst growing disillusionment, all eyes turned to one man. A man who found himself with the power to change the landscape of British politics - and his career - forever. But at what cost?”

The Sun reports that Paddy Power last night has David Morrissey tipped at 4/1 to play him, while Brad Pitt was standing at 100/1.

Wallace, from Wallace and Gromit, is tipped at 250/1 to appear as Ed Miliband.


Tory modernisers call for new coalition

Conservative campaign organisation Bright Blue has warned the party that another coalition with the Liberal Democrats may be the only way for the party to keep power. The group said the party should continue with its modernising agenda and not lurch to the right, as many core-conservative groups are suggesting.


Osborne cool on wealth tax

The Government must be careful not to "drive away wealth creators" with taxation, George Osborne has warned.

Speaking during a visit to Sunderland, the Chancellor said the wealthy “need to pay more”, but added it was the “entrepreneurs, the business leaders who create the jobs to help the economy move forward".

His comments come after Nick Clegg called for the introduction of a wealth tax for a limited period. In an interview with the Guardian, the Deputy Prime Minister said increased contributions from those of "very considerable" wealth could help retain a "cohesive and prosperous" Britain.

In the first major interview by a Coalition minister before the start of the new political season, Mr Clegg also invited Lib Dem David Laws back into the Coalition. "I have never made any secret of the fact that I want to see David Laws back in government," Mr Clegg told the newspaper.

Lib Dem deputy leader Simon Hughes told BBC Radio 4's the World at One his party was serious about the wealth tax idea, and dismissed accusations of political posturing.

"We are not just flying a kite at all, this is a long-held principle," he said.

"We now want to go back to the issue of wealth inequality - you won’t get the best economic solutions if you ignore the increasingly obscene levels of wealth inequality in this country."

But Conservative backbenchers have expressed anger over the idea, with Bernard Jenkin dismissing it as the "politics of envy" and claiming it would "strangling the goose that lays the golden egg".

Tory MP Mark Pritchard has also rejected the call, telling PoliticsHome that high taxes were "part of the problem with the UK economy - not part of the cure".

Labour's John Mann, who sits on the Treasury committee, accused Mr Clegg of "flannelling" in the run-up to his party conference.

"There’s obviously a conference coming up, it is rather excruciating listening to Mr Clegg. This is the worst kind of conference flannelling in advance, desperately trying to create some distance," he said.


Eleven bills in Queen's Speech - but Labour calls for more

David Cameron and Nick Clegg have hailed the “bold steps” set out in the Government’s legislative agenda for the final session of the Parliament, but Ed Miliband has said the Queen's Speech should have been more wide-ranging.

Eleven bills were announced in the Queen’s Speech, which introduced a charge for plastic bags and a new Modern Slavery Bill.

However Labour sources said it was "staggering" that the NHS and immigration were not mentioned today and Mr Miliband outlined seven further bills that he would have included.

The speech began with a nod to both the Conservative slogan of a “long-term economic plan”, and the Lib Dems’ promise to build a “stronger economy and fairer society”.

“My government’s legislative programme will continue to deliver on its long-term plan to build a stronger economy and a fairer society,” Her Majesty said.

Speaking in the House this afternoon, Mr Cameron said: "Our long-term economic plan is working but there is much much more to do....

"This Queen's Speech sets out the next steps in seeing through this vital plan to secure our future but it will take the rest of this parliament and the next to finish the task of turning our country around. That is the enormity of the challenge we face but, Mr Speaker, it is matched by the strength of our commitment to sorting it out."

Mr Miliband said there were measures his party supported in the Queen's Speech "including tackling modern slavery, an Ombudsman for our Armed Forces and recall".

But he maintained that the speech failed to live up to the scale of the challenges facing Britain and that Mr Cameron should have gone further.

"There is a chasm between the needs and the wishes of the people of this country and whether or not this House and politics is capable of responding," he told MPs.

"We need to rise to this challenge, but this Queen's Speech doesn't do it. But it can be done...

"This is what the Queen’s Speech should have done: A Make Work Pay bill to reward hard work, a Banking Bill to support small business; a Community Bill to devolve power; an Immigration Bill to stop workers being undercut; a Consumers Bill to freeze energy bills; a Housing Bill to tackle the housing crisis; and an NHS Bill to make it easier to see your GP and stop his privatisation."


Conference profits up

Profits from political conferences have rocketed despite party memberships dropping to all-time lows, research by the Times has found. Although conference attendances are suffering at the grassroots level, the media, lobbying groups and corporate representatives are filling the gap, and being charged for the privilege. The Lib Dems made £570,000 last year, more than double what they made five years ago.


Voters doubt coalition future

The majority of voters do not believe the Coalition will last until the next general election, a new poll has shown.

A Guardian/ICM poll found that, after a difficult period for the Government in which Lords reform was abandoned and boundary changes opposed by the Liberal Democrats, just 16% of the electorate expects the Coalition to last until 2015.