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Theresa May MP

Home Secretary

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  • 16:20 Tele: Sex abuse victims accidentally named by MPs News

    News | Telegraph blog source icon

    Home affairs select committee publishes documents naming victims of abuse on its website Continue to article

  • 16:15 Sky: Abuse Survivors' Death Threats After Leak News

    News | Sky News source icon

    Continue to article

  • 17:41 Story (2 links): Abuse victims 'names published by MPs'

    PoliticsHome Abuse victims 'names published by MPs' Story View links

    Victims of child sexual abuse have received death threats after their identities and personal details were published by the Home Affairs Select Committee.

    Members of the child sexual abuse inquiry have written to the Home Secretary expressing their concern over the publication of documents online containing the names of four victims.

    In a statement to the Home Secretary the group said: "It has exposed us as individuals, making us feel vulnerable, and is having a huge impact on our work."

    The names and contact details have since been redacted from the site.

    Theresa May has written to chair of the Committee Keith Vaz describing her “dismay” at the breach of privacy, Sky News reports.

    The child sexual abuse inquiry is currently suspended and awaiting a new chair, after its two previous heads stepped down over alleged links to the establishment.

    Ms May is due to announce a replacement before the end of the month.

  • = Key Development Monday 26th January
  • 16:48 In Brief Events

    16:48 | Events | PoliticsHome Events

    Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg embarks on a UK regional tour Home Secretary Theresa May speaks at the international police and crime conference in London (10:00am) Defence Secretary Michael Fallon speaks about defence reform at an I... Continue to article

  • = Key Development Sunday 25th January
  • 07:04 Times: The Tory fight to be top dog (£) News

    News | The Sunday Times source icon

    Boris Johnson and George Osborne have forged an unlikely alliance to thwart Theresa May in any race for the party leadership Continue to article

  • = Key Development Thursday 22nd January
  • 11:12 Chair of the Govt's child abuse inquiry will be announced by end of January - May House of Commons

    Chair of the Govt's child abuse inquiry will be announced by end of January - May House of Commons

    The Home Secretary has confirmed that the chair of the Government’s inquiry into child sex abuse will be appointed by the end of January.      Responding to an Urgent Question, Theresa May told MPs that she was “absolutely committed to f... Continue to article

  • = Key Development Sunday 18th January
  • 12:29 May seeks to reassure Jewish community after 'appalling' rise in anti-Semitism PoliticsHome News

    May seeks to reassure Jewish community after 'appalling' rise in anti-Semitism PoliticsHome News

    Theresa May has issued a strong defence of British Jews’ place in a multi-ethnic, multi-faith Britain, as she voiced concern about an “appalling spike in anti-Semitism” in recent months. The Home Secretary joined her Cabinet colleague E... Continue to article

  • = Key Development Thursday 15th January
  • 20:00 Screen Test The House Magazine

    20:00 | The House Magazine | PoliticsHome The House Magazine Screen Test

      Words: Paul Waugh Photos: Paul Heartfield      For a woman whose weekend lie-in was ruined by pre-dawn tablet computer action, Nicky Morgan looks remarkably bright-eyed and bushy-tailed. “Alex woke us up at half past fiv... Continue to article

  • = Key Development Wednesday 14th January
  • 12:47 Theresa May: Innocent lives at risk unless MPs agree comms data reforms House of Commons

    Theresa May: Innocent lives at risk unless MPs agree comms data reforms House of Commons

    Theresa May has issued a stark message to those who oppose extending security agencies’ access to communications data, warning that “innocent lives will be put at risk”. The Conservatives have called for the Communications Data Bill, wh... Continue to article

  • = Key Development Friday 9th January
  • 17:45 House of Lords Business Lords Business

    17:45 | Lords Business | PoliticsHome Lords Business

    Lords Chamber 3.00pm: Oral questions, to ask the government: - What is their assessment of the report of the Office of Democratic Institutions and Human Rights of the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe on monitoring o... Continue to article

  • 17:35 House of Commons Business Commons Business

    17:35 | Commons Business | PoliticsHome Commons Business

    COMMONS CHAMBER 2:30pm: Defence questions (Topicals at 3:15pm) Main business Stamp Duty Land Tax Bill: Committee and remaining stages Consumer Rights Bill: Consideration of Lords amendments Motion to approve a carry-over exten... Continue to article

  • = Key Development Thursday 8th January
  • 23:15 Cable: we must be intolerant of intolerance in wake of Paris attacks PoliticsHome News

    Cable: we must be intolerant of intolerance in wake of Paris attacks PoliticsHome News

    Vince Cable has warned about the dangers of turning against the Muslim community in the wake of the attacks in Paris. Appearing on BBC’s Question Time, the Business Secretary said the public should be “very, very careful” not to allow in... Continue to article

  • 16:42 Story (57 links): UK security increased after Paris attack

    PoliticsHome UK security increased after Paris attack Story View links

    British security is being stepped up at UK borders in the wake of yesterday’s terrorist attack in Paris, the Government has confirmed.

    After a meeting of the emergency Cobra committee today, the threat level will remain at “severe”, indicating an attack is highly likely, after officials concluded there was no specific intelligence to justify increasing it to “critical”.

    Theresa May, who chaired the committee this morning, said the heightened security at UK ports, Calais and the Gare Du Nord was a “precautionary step” that would remain in place “for the time being”.

    “Officers from Border Force, the police and other organisations operating at the UK border have intensified checks on passengers, on vehicles and goods coming from France and other parts of Europe,” the Home Secretary said.

    “This is not in response to specific intelligence or a plot against the United Kingdom, but these measures remain in place and will continue to do so for the time being.”

    Cobra heard from the heads of Britain’s three intelligence agencies and was also attended by Defence Secretary Michael Fallon, Foreign Office Minister Tobias Ellwood, the National Security Adviser and, via video link, the UK’s ambassador in Paris.

    The Prime Minister’s spokeswoman also revealed this morning that an extra Metropolitan Police counter-terrorism team had been deployed to Paris to liaise with French authorities.

    Twelve people, including several journalists and two policemen, were shot dead by gunmen during an attack on the office of the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo.

    David Cameron revealed today that flags on Downing Street would be flown at half-mast as a show of unity with France, while Home Secretary Theresa May is to sign a book of condolence at the French Embassy in London.

    Speaking today in Manchester, the Prime Minister repeated his message of solidarity with France and promised the UK would not have its values changed by such attacks.

    "These events are a challenge to our security because we have to fight this terrorism with everything that we have. But they're also a challenge to our values," he said.

    "And while, when it comes to security, we must use every part of vigilance and security that we have, when it comes to a challenge to our values, the best way to stand up for our values is to repeat our belief in them, in the freedom of speech, in the rule of law, in democracy, in tolerance, in faith in the way we do things. 

    "And nothing, and no one will be able to push us off that path.”

    This morning another police officer was shot and killed on the southern outskirts of the French capital, with a civilian injured in the same incident.

    The two main suspects in the Charlie Hebdo attack are still on the run, but French authorities have arrested seven people believed to be connected to the attackers.

     

  • 15:53 Ed Miliband: Farage shouldn't use Paris attacks to score political points On air

    On Air | Ed Miliband MP | Labour party leader | BBC News Video Ed Miliband MP

    Ed Miliband criticised the Ukip leader Nigel Farage for blaming the Paris shootings on multiculturalism.    “I don’t think people should be using the tragic events in Paris to score political points. I think the most important thing for ... Continue to article

  • 13:12 David Cameron: Charlie Hebdo attack a challenge to the values we believe in On air

    On Air | David Cameron MP | Prime Minister | Sky News Video David Cameron MP

    David Cameron described yesterday's attack on the offices of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo as an assault on democratic values. “First of all, on our security, we already have the state of alert at its second-highest level, at t... Continue to article

  • 13:03 Diane Abbott: Ed Miliband's anti-internationalist stance is not opportunistic On air

    On Air | Diane Abbott MP | Labour MP | Daily Politics, BBC 2 Video Diane Abbott MP

    Diane Abbott denied that Ed Miliband had been opportunistic for opposing military intervention in Syria. “You can call Ed Miliband a lot of things, and he is currently being called a lot of them, but he is not an opportunist. The truth i... Continue to article

  • 12:53 Theresa May: UK increasing security after Paris attacks On air

    On Air | Theresa May MP | Home Secretary | Pooled Footage Video Theresa May MP

    Theresa May gave her response to the murders in Paris yesterday, and announced that the UK was stepping up its security presence on the border with France. “In deliberately targeting and murdering journalists, the terrorists were attacki... Continue to article

  • 12:44 David Cameron: Charlie Hebdo killings a 'challenge to our values' PoliticsHome News

    David Cameron: Charlie Hebdo killings a 'challenge to our values' PoliticsHome News David Cameron: Charlie Hebdo killings a 'challenge to our values'

    The massacre at the Paris office of a satirical magazine represents "a challenge to our values", David Cameron has said. Twelve people were murdered in the attack on the Charlie Hebdo magazine yesterday, and the Prime Minister this morni... Continue to article

  • 12:30 Sir Menzies Campbell: Terror threat means we must consider security that would otherwise be unacceptable On air

    On Air | Sir Menzies Campbell MP | Former Liberal Democrat leader | BBC News Video Sir Menzies Campbell MP

    Sir Menzies Campbell said the threat of a similar attack to that which left 12 people dead in Paris yesterday meant the UK needed to consider measures which would be “in ordinary circumstances unacceptable”. “Unlike Lee Rigby – and remem... Continue to article

  • 09:35 Nick Clegg: No excuse, no reason, no rationale for Paris attacks On air

    On Air | Nick Clegg MP | Deputy PM and Lib Dem leader | Call Clegg, LBC Video Nick Clegg MP

    Nick Clegg strongly pushed back at a caller who suggested that there had been some form of provocation on the part of Charlie Hebdo, where 12 people were shot dead yesterday. “There can be no excuse, no reason, no explanation. They have ... Continue to article

  • 07:23 Story (3 links): Boris speaks out against May's graduate plans

    PoliticsHome Boris speaks out against May's graduate plans Story View links

    Boris Johnson has become the latest senior Conservative to state his opposition to Theresa May’s plan to require international students to leave the UK immediately after graduating. The Mayor of London said foreign students played an “indispensable” role in the economy and were central to leading industries around the world. George Osborne has reportedly blocked the proposal's inclusion in the Tory manifesto. The Prime Minister’s spokesperson said yesterday that the Government already had the “right approach” of letting graduates stay if they had a job offer.

  • = Key Development Monday 5th January
  • 15:54 May defends graduate deportation plans House of Commons

    May defends graduate deportation plans House of Commons

    Theresa May has defended plans to force foreign graduates to leave the UK as soon as they complete their studies, following criticism from the inventor Sir James Dyson. The famed designer attacked the Home Secretary's proposal in a piece... Continue to article

  • 12:25 Osborne leads Tory attack on Labour spending plans PoliticsHome News

    Osborne leads Tory attack on Labour spending plans PoliticsHome News Osborne leads Tory attack on Labour spending plans

    Conservative Cabinet ministers have rounded on Labour's economic plans, accusing the party of making unfunded spending promises. A group of Tory ministers, led by Chancellor George Osborne, unveiled Treasury analysis that they claim show... Continue to article

  • = Key Development Monday 22nd December
  • 19:01 Steve Richards blog: Could the real Theresa May please stand up? News

    Blog | The Independent source icon

    The Home Secretary is shy and lacking in overt political guile, and yet at the same time an almost certain leadership candidate Continue to article

  • 17:23 Story (18 links): Abuse survivors seek changes to inquiry

    PoliticsHome Abuse survivors seek changes to inquiry Story View links

    Child abuse survivors have welcomed reports that a panel looking into allegations of crimes could be scrapped and replaced.

    In a letter to the members of the current panel, Theresa May opened the possibility of disbanding the current structure and handing a new body statutory powers.

    Dozens of survivors and representative groups have written to the Home Secretary asking her to allow the inquiry to compel witnesses to give evidence and for a police team to work alongside the investigation.

    Speaking this morning, Peter Saunders, who heads the National Association for People Abused in Childhood, backed changes to the personnel examining the allegations.

    “I have yet to encounter any survivors themselves who have any confidence in the process and in the panel as it is currently constituted,” he told the Today programme.

    Former director of public prosecutions Lord Macdonald also urged Ms May to start again from scratch with a more narrowly focused probe.

    "She should start again, she should go for something much more focused on the future and she should let the police get on with their serious, forensic and tough investigations into this category of crime," he told the World at One.

    But Simon Danczuk, a Labour MP who was one of the leading voices in calling for an abuse inquiry, accused the Government of making “deliberate mistakes” in its handling of the panel and said survivors would believe there was another cover-up going on.

    “You can’t help thinking that they aren’t intent on getting this right,” he told the Today programme.

    He added that he believed abuse survivors would turn to forms of “direct action” because of the issues with the inquiry.

    Speaking after Mr Danczuk, Mr Saunders made clear that he had no questions about the intentions of Ms May, who he said had “stuck her neck out” to set up the inquiry.

    Tory MP Tim Loughton added that he believed Mr Danczuk’s comment was “really unhelpful”.

    Labour's John Mann, meanwhile, said lifting Official Secrets Act restrictions on Special Branch officers with information on historical abuse is "the most vital thing that Theresa May needs to do" to further the progress of the inquiry.

    "The restrictions of the Official Secrets Act in relation to historic child abuse need to be lifted by Theresa May or by Parliament if that’s what’s required in order that those people actually in reality feel compelled to come forward and share the information that they have, because don’t forget – Special Branch was keeping an eye, particularly on senior MPs, and there’s a lot of information there that is not available to those police officers investigating at the moment," he told Sky News.


  • 14:50 John Mann: Theresa May must lift restrictions on officers with information on historical sex abuse On air

    On Air | John Mann MP | Labour MP | Sky News Video John Mann MP

    John Mann called on the Home Secretary to lift restrictions placed on Special Branch officers under the Official Secrets Act in order to further the investigation into historical allegations of child sexual abuse involving Westminster polit... Continue to article

  • 13:15 Lord Macdonald: Child sex abuse inquiry should be much more closely focused On air

    On Air | Lord Macdonald | Former Director of Public Pros... | World at One, BBC Radio 4 Video Lord Macdonald

    Lord Macdonald argued that the remit of the inquiry into historical allegations of child sex abuse should be significantly narrowed. “This inquiry’s now been going for five months, and it hasn’t achieved anything. I think there’s a probl... Continue to article

  • 11:25 Diana Johnson: Abuse inquiry processes have been a mess On air

    On Air | Diana Johnson MP | Shadow Home Office Minister | BBC News Video Diana Johnson MP

    Diana Johnson said Theresa May had presided over a “mess” in the setting up of the child abuse inquiry. “There was an enormous amount of goodwill in setting up this inquiry. I think what the problem has been is the lack of consultation w... Continue to article

  • 10:41 Tessa Munt: Theresa May is utterly determined on abuse inquiry On air

    On Air | Tessa Munt MP | | BBC News Video Tessa Munt MP

    Tessa Munt said Theresa May remained determined to get the inquiry into child abuse underway, despite the ongoing problems that have dogged the investigation. “I’ve met her several times and my sense is that she is utterly determined to ... Continue to article

  • 08:28 Peter Saunders: Survivors would welcome reset of abuse inquiry On air

    On Air | Peter Saunders | Chief executive, NAPAC | Today, BBC Radio 4

    Peter Saunders welcomed reports that the government-commissioned child abuse panel could be scrapped and reconstituted with stronger powers. “Having had three meetings with the Home Secretary where she has patiently listened to the conce... Continue to article

  • 08:26 Tim Loughton: Don't delay abuse inquiry again On air

    On Air | Tim Loughton MP | Conservative MP | Today, BBC Radio 4 Video Tim Loughton MP

    Tim Loughton warned against scrapping the current panel looking into child abuse and starting again on a stronger statutory footing. “This panel isn’t perfect, but there are some very well-qualified, decent people on the panel who have g... Continue to article

  • 08:09 Story (5 links): Home Secretary warned over Spad spat

    PoliticsHome Home Secretary warned over Spad spat Story View links

    The Home Secretary has been warned that her leadership bid could be damaged due to her row over her special advisers, who have been banned from standing for parliament.

    Cabinet colleagues have told Theresa May to act as a “team player” or risk scuppering her chances at succeeding David Cameron.

    Ms May is being told to rein in her special advisors, who were stopped from standing for election after declining to take part in a phone campaign over worries it would breach their code of conduct.

    A Conservative source told the Guardian it “doesn’t do her any favours” and “other colleagues have come to the conclusion that she is not a team player”.

  • 07:21 Simon Danczuk: Abuse inquiry problems could lead to direct action On air

    On Air | Simon Danczuk MP | | Today, BBC Radio 4 Video Simon Danczuk MP

    Simon Danczuk predicted the problems with the government-commissioned inquiry into child abuse would lead to “direct action”. “The Home Secretary in this process is in complete disarray and what you have to think about are the survivors ... Continue to article

  • = Key Development Sunday 21st December
  • 09:33 Ken Clarke: EU debate has been disastrous On air

    On Air | Ken Clarke MP | Conservative MP | Andrew Marr Show, BBC One Video Ken Clarke MP

    Ken Clarke bemoaned the “disastrous” debate about Britain’s membership of the European Union. “We’ve had a rather silly debate about Europe over the last six months. In fact, the political debate in this country over the last six months ... Continue to article

  • = Key Development Friday 19th December
  • 06:56 Paul Goodman blog: Theresa May’s special adviser claims to have been removed from the candidates list after refusing to break the SpAd code of conduct News

    Blog | ConservativeHome source icon

    A tale that involves a special adviser to Theresa May, the blocking of his application by CCHQ, and his removal from the candidates list on highly contentious grounds Continue to article

  • = Key Development Thursday 18th December
  • 17:17 Story (3 links): May's mental health shake up

    PoliticsHome May's mental health shake up Story View links

    The Government has confirmed it will bring in legislation to stop teenagers and children experiencing mental health problems being held in police cells.

    Home Secretary Theresa May said that there was “no place for [keeping children in police cells] in our society”. 

    Care Minister Norman Lamb added that keeping mentally-ill people in police stations was an “unacceptable state of affairs”.

    The new legislation would also see the length of time people suffering from mental distress can be detained reduced from 72 to 24 hours.

  • 12:07 Labour welcomes steps to cap the amount of time people can normally be kept on police bail - Jack Dromey Press Release

    12:07| Press Release

    Labour press release Jack Dromey MP, Labour's Shadow Policing Minister, said: "Labour welcomes steps to cap the amount of time people can normally be kept on police bail. "People under investigation should know as soon as possible if... Continue to article

  • 11:40 Story (6 links): Bail for suspects reduced to 28 days

    PoliticsHome Bail for suspects reduced to 28 days Story View links

    The Home Secretary has today announced plans to limit bail for criminal suspects to 28 days.

    Under the new proposals, the four-week deadline will only be extended in exceptional circumstances.

    The reforms will end the practice of bail being extended indefinitely, but the move has reportedly been met with opposition from the police and some legal figures.

    Announcing the launch of a consultation on the plans, Theresa May said in a statement: "This government is determined to support the police as they work tirelessly to bring justice to victims.

    "But it cannot be right that people can spend months or even years on pre-charge bail with no oversight. That is why we launched a review to fundamentally re-examine the way pre-charge bail is used and authorised.

    "I believe we need a statutory time limit in place to ensure people do not spend months or even years on bail, only for no charges to be brought. I encourage people to share their views and help shape these reforms."


  • 11:07 Source:Statutory time limits for police bail News

    Source | UK Parliament source icon

    Continue to article

  • 10:06 Roy Greenslade blog: I salute Theresa May for limiting the use of police bail News

    Blog | The Guardian source icon

    I salute Theresa May for seeing the light on this matter and being prepared to take on the police over a matter of civil and human rights. Continue to article

  • = Key Development Tuesday 16th December
  • 12:51 Lobby:No 10: EVEL is not about House of Lords Lobby Briefings

    12:51 | Lobby Briefings | PoliticsHome Lobby Briefings

    The Prime Minister’s Official Spokesman updated journalists on what was discussed at Cabinet this morning. He said that Theresa May and Eric Pickles gave an update on work to tackle child sexual exploitation; Sajid Javid gave an update o... Continue to article

  • = Key Development Monday 15th December
  • 17:37 Story (9 links): May denies torture report redactions

    PoliticsHome May denies torture report redactions Story View links

    The Home Secretary has denied asking for redactions in the CIA torture report and rejected calls for a judge-led inquiry into British involvement in US-led torture.  

    Appearing in front of the Home Affairs Committee this afternoon, Theresa May told MPs: “I have certainly not asked for any redactions to take place in the report.”       

    She did not say whether other Home Office officials had asked for the redactions, but added that they would only have been requested for reasons of national security.

    Ms May rejected the need for a judge-led inquiry into questions on the role of British troops in the torture, saying that the Intelligence and Security Committee would carry out adequate investigations.

    “I think there is proper committee in place to undertake the inquiry,” she said.    

    She also said that she had no knowledge of UK forces being complicit in torture, telling the Committee: “I am not aware of any evidence that British agents or officials have been involved in any way.”

    The British Government, she said, had set out “very clear guidance” on how British forces should conduct themselves on the issue. 

    Amid reports former prime minister Tony Blair and former foreign secretary Jack Straw could be called to give evidence, Nick Clegg told his monthly press conference today that anyone found to have been complicit in mistreatment should face the"full rule of the law".

    The Deputy Prime Minister said: "The next pragmatic step is to let the police get on with their work as soon as possible but also...to go, as [Intelligence and Security Committee chair] Malcolm Rifkind has said, in pursuit of the truth without any fear or favour, including calling as witnesses, as individuals who need to be further questioned, politicians who were in charge...of the government at the time."

    A spokesperson for Mr Blair issued a statement this afternoon saying that the former prime minister had "always been opposed to the use of torture" and had "always said so publicly and privately".

    "He believes the fight against radical Islamism is a fight about values, and acting contrary to those values - as in the use of torture - is therefore not just wrong but counter-productive," the spokesperson added.

  • 17:31 Theresa May denies asking for redactions in CIA torture report House of Commons

    Theresa May denies asking for redactions in CIA torture report House of Commons

    The Home Secretary has today denied asking for redactions in the CIA torture report and  rejected calls for a judge-led inquiry into British involvement in orture.   Appearing in front of the Home Affairs Committee this afternoon, Theres... Continue to article

  • 09:11 Isabel Hardman blog: Theresa May’s moral mission: Home Secretary to stop sick children being locked up News

    Blog | Coffee House source icon

    Theresa May will announce changes the Mental Health Act this week that mean mentally ill teenagers are never held in police cells when they should be in a hospital bed. Continue to article

  • 07:25 Rory Stewart: Does Britain really fully understand Iraq mission? On air

    On Air | Rory Stewart MP | Defence Select Committee chair | Today, BBC Radio 4 Video Rory Stewart MP

    Rory Stewart questioned whether the UK had an overall strategy for tackling Islamic State militants in Iraq. "I think the biggest question is over the overall mission. Training the Iraqi army is something that's happened a great deal ove... Continue to article

  • 07:00 Isabel Hardman: Disturbed children need a doctor, not a night in the cells (£) News

    Opinion | The Times source icon

    Theresa May is right to argue for change to the custody laws Continue to article

  • = Key Development Friday 12th December
  • 17:26 House of Commons Business Commons Business

    17:26 | Commons Business | PoliticsHome Commons Business

    COMMONS CHAMBER 2:30pm: Communities and Local Government questions (topicals at 3:15pm) Main business Firefighters’ Pension Scheme (England) Regulations 2014: Motion to revoke Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill: Committee (Day 2... Continue to article

  • 11:45 Lobby:Number 10: May met US Senate Intelligence Committee Lobby Briefings

    11:45 | Lobby Briefings | PoliticsHome Lobby Briefings

    Theresa May met members of the US Senate Intelligence Committee ahead of publication of its report on the CIA's abuse of detainees, Downing Street has confirmed. According to a document seen by the Daily Mail, UK ministers and diplomats ... Continue to article

  • = Key Development Thursday 11th December
  • 22:42 "I had to do what I thought was right" News

    Blog | Total Politics source icon

    "She knew about the Trojan Horse plot, I told her,” Tommy Robinson says of the home secretary Theresa May. Continue to article

  • = Key Development Wednesday 10th December
  • 13:13 Labour slams Government on Syrian refugee numbers PoliticsHome News

    Labour slams Government on Syrian refugee numbers PoliticsHome News

    Labour has attacked the Government’s record on helping to resettle Syrian refugees, and called on them to join the UN’s scheme of offering places to those in need instead. Shadow Home Secretary Yvette Cooper, during an Urgent Question in... Continue to article

  • = Key Development Monday 8th December
  • 13:14 In Brief Events

    13:14 | Events | PoliticsHome Events

    A by-election takes place to elect two hereditary peers to sit in the House of Lords following the death of Viscount Allenby and the retirement of Lord Cobbold Prime Minister David Cameron continues his visit to Turkey before traveling t... Continue to article

  • = Key Development Thursday 4th December
  • 11:06 Government reviewing extradition countries list – May PoliticsHome News

    Government reviewing extradition countries list – May PoliticsHome News

    The UK is reviewing the list of countries with which it has extradition arrangements, the Home Secretary has said. Theresa May told the House of Lords Extradition Law Committee that some states currently included on the UK’s list of safe... Continue to article

  • = Key Development Tuesday 2nd December
  • 17:04 Terror suspects can challenge exclusion orders in the courts, says May House of Commons

    Terror suspects can challenge exclusion orders in the courts, says May House of Commons Terror suspects can challenge exclusion orders in the courts, says May

    Terror suspects subject to new "managed return" anti-terror powers will be able to appeal them through judicial review, Theresa May has confirmed. Temporary Exclusion Orders are one of the key measures included in the Government's new Co... Continue to article

Stories involving Theresa May

Abuse victims 'names published by MPs'

Victims of child sexual abuse have received death threats after their identities and personal details were published by the Home Affairs Select Committee.

Members of the child sexual abuse inquiry have written to the Home Secretary expressing their concern over the publication of documents online containing the names of four victims.

In a statement to the Home Secretary the group said: "It has exposed us as individuals, making us feel vulnerable, and is having a huge impact on our work."

The names and contact details have since been redacted from the site.

Theresa May has written to chair of the Committee Keith Vaz describing her “dismay” at the breach of privacy, Sky News reports.

The child sexual abuse inquiry is currently suspended and awaiting a new chair, after its two previous heads stepped down over alleged links to the establishment.

Ms May is due to announce a replacement before the end of the month.


Boris speaks out against May's graduate plans

Boris Johnson has become the latest senior Conservative to state his opposition to Theresa May’s plan to require international students to leave the UK immediately after graduating. The Mayor of London said foreign students played an “indispensable” role in the economy and were central to leading industries around the world. George Osborne has reportedly blocked the proposal's inclusion in the Tory manifesto. The Prime Minister’s spokesperson said yesterday that the Government already had the “right approach” of letting graduates stay if they had a job offer.


Home Secretary warned over Spad spat

The Home Secretary has been warned that her leadership bid could be damaged due to her row over her special advisers, who have been banned from standing for parliament.

Cabinet colleagues have told Theresa May to act as a “team player” or risk scuppering her chances at succeeding David Cameron.

Ms May is being told to rein in her special advisors, who were stopped from standing for election after declining to take part in a phone campaign over worries it would breach their code of conduct.

A Conservative source told the Guardian it “doesn’t do her any favours” and “other colleagues have come to the conclusion that she is not a team player”.


UK security increased after Paris attack

British security is being stepped up at UK borders in the wake of yesterday’s terrorist attack in Paris, the Government has confirmed.

After a meeting of the emergency Cobra committee today, the threat level will remain at “severe”, indicating an attack is highly likely, after officials concluded there was no specific intelligence to justify increasing it to “critical”.

Theresa May, who chaired the committee this morning, said the heightened security at UK ports, Calais and the Gare Du Nord was a “precautionary step” that would remain in place “for the time being”.

“Officers from Border Force, the police and other organisations operating at the UK border have intensified checks on passengers, on vehicles and goods coming from France and other parts of Europe,” the Home Secretary said.

“This is not in response to specific intelligence or a plot against the United Kingdom, but these measures remain in place and will continue to do so for the time being.”

Cobra heard from the heads of Britain’s three intelligence agencies and was also attended by Defence Secretary Michael Fallon, Foreign Office Minister Tobias Ellwood, the National Security Adviser and, via video link, the UK’s ambassador in Paris.

The Prime Minister’s spokeswoman also revealed this morning that an extra Metropolitan Police counter-terrorism team had been deployed to Paris to liaise with French authorities.

Twelve people, including several journalists and two policemen, were shot dead by gunmen during an attack on the office of the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo.

David Cameron revealed today that flags on Downing Street would be flown at half-mast as a show of unity with France, while Home Secretary Theresa May is to sign a book of condolence at the French Embassy in London.

Speaking today in Manchester, the Prime Minister repeated his message of solidarity with France and promised the UK would not have its values changed by such attacks.

"These events are a challenge to our security because we have to fight this terrorism with everything that we have. But they're also a challenge to our values," he said.

"And while, when it comes to security, we must use every part of vigilance and security that we have, when it comes to a challenge to our values, the best way to stand up for our values is to repeat our belief in them, in the freedom of speech, in the rule of law, in democracy, in tolerance, in faith in the way we do things. 

"And nothing, and no one will be able to push us off that path.”

This morning another police officer was shot and killed on the southern outskirts of the French capital, with a civilian injured in the same incident.

The two main suspects in the Charlie Hebdo attack are still on the run, but French authorities have arrested seven people believed to be connected to the attackers.

 


Abuse survivors seek changes to inquiry

Child abuse survivors have welcomed reports that a panel looking into allegations of crimes could be scrapped and replaced.

In a letter to the members of the current panel, Theresa May opened the possibility of disbanding the current structure and handing a new body statutory powers.

Dozens of survivors and representative groups have written to the Home Secretary asking her to allow the inquiry to compel witnesses to give evidence and for a police team to work alongside the investigation.

Speaking this morning, Peter Saunders, who heads the National Association for People Abused in Childhood, backed changes to the personnel examining the allegations.

“I have yet to encounter any survivors themselves who have any confidence in the process and in the panel as it is currently constituted,” he told the Today programme.

Former director of public prosecutions Lord Macdonald also urged Ms May to start again from scratch with a more narrowly focused probe.

"She should start again, she should go for something much more focused on the future and she should let the police get on with their serious, forensic and tough investigations into this category of crime," he told the World at One.

But Simon Danczuk, a Labour MP who was one of the leading voices in calling for an abuse inquiry, accused the Government of making “deliberate mistakes” in its handling of the panel and said survivors would believe there was another cover-up going on.

“You can’t help thinking that they aren’t intent on getting this right,” he told the Today programme.

He added that he believed abuse survivors would turn to forms of “direct action” because of the issues with the inquiry.

Speaking after Mr Danczuk, Mr Saunders made clear that he had no questions about the intentions of Ms May, who he said had “stuck her neck out” to set up the inquiry.

Tory MP Tim Loughton added that he believed Mr Danczuk’s comment was “really unhelpful”.

Labour's John Mann, meanwhile, said lifting Official Secrets Act restrictions on Special Branch officers with information on historical abuse is "the most vital thing that Theresa May needs to do" to further the progress of the inquiry.

"The restrictions of the Official Secrets Act in relation to historic child abuse need to be lifted by Theresa May or by Parliament if that’s what’s required in order that those people actually in reality feel compelled to come forward and share the information that they have, because don’t forget – Special Branch was keeping an eye, particularly on senior MPs, and there’s a lot of information there that is not available to those police officers investigating at the moment," he told Sky News.



May's mental health shake up

The Government has confirmed it will bring in legislation to stop teenagers and children experiencing mental health problems being held in police cells.

Home Secretary Theresa May said that there was “no place for [keeping children in police cells] in our society”. 

Care Minister Norman Lamb added that keeping mentally-ill people in police stations was an “unacceptable state of affairs”.

The new legislation would also see the length of time people suffering from mental distress can be detained reduced from 72 to 24 hours.