UPDATING LIVE: At-a-glance guide to the latest batch of the Government's no-deal Brexit warnings

Posted On: 
13th September 2018

The second raft of papers explaining how Britain should prepare for a possible no-deal Brexit have been revealed by the Government. PoliticsHome is reading through them so you don't have to and updating the list below. 

The Government has been stepping up their preparations for a no-deal Brexit
Credit: 
PA Images

* UK driving licences will not automatically be valid on the continent after a no-deal Brexit. People wishing to drive temporarily abroad will have to obtain a £5.50 permit. Those who want to move abroad will have to switch their licence - and may have to take another test.

* People travelling to the UK after a no-deal Brexit should have a passport valid for at least 6 months. The Government advises those who do not have six months on their passport to apply for a new passport.

* Blue passports will start being issued from late 2019.

* The ban on extra charges to use mobile phones around the continent would no longer apply to the EU. A number of big operators have said they do not plan to hike fees - but the Government urges people to check with their providers before travelling. 

* Car manufacturers will have to apply for new safety certificates to import and export new models and new parts between the UK and EU countries after a no-deal Brexit. Firms will also have to convert existing certificates - but the Government will offer a provisional certificate scheme which should be in place by the Brexit date of March next year.

* People fighting cross border civil or family legal disputes should get legal advice to ensure aspects of their case apply in the relevant countries after a no-deal Brexit.

* Broadcasting compaines might be well advised to move part of their workforce to an EU country to ensure they are still licenced to broadcast there.

* Shipping companies, including ferries carrying people and lorries may have to complete pre-notification notices (PAN) outlining vessel and passenger details for each journey between here and the EU.

* The UK would be booted out of the EU Space Surveillance and Tracking programme, meaning it would not have access to information about space debris colliding with satellites or falling back down to earth.

* Companies trading in drug precursor chemicals will need to obtain the same export licenses for dealing with the EU as they currenty do for dealing with third party non-EU countries. Some companies would also be forced to register with the Home Office and obtain new licenses for exporting.