DPP's credibility is 'struggling' over Janner decision, says Danczuk

Posted On: 
22nd April 2015

Labour politician Simon Danczuk has called for Director of Public Prosecutions Alison Saunders to apologise over decisions by the Crown Prosecution Service not to prosecute Lord Janner.

The CPS said the 86-year-old peer would not face charges for child sexual abuse due to his dementia, in spite of the fact that the evidential test determining whether evidence provides a realistic prospect of conviction had been met.

A cross-party group of politicians wrote a letter published in the Times this morning, urging Ms Saunders to reverse the decision.

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"I think Alison Saunders’ credibility is struggling already. I mean, this decision is causing her problems quite understandably, because the public interest is in seeing justice," Mr Danczuk said.

He insisted he wanted to see more pressure put on Ms Saunders to apologise for previous CPS decisions not to prosecute Lord Janner, and for a trial to be held - without Lord Janner present if need be.

"If he is as ill as is suggested, then we could still have a trial in his absence," he said.

Mr Danczuk also complained that Lord Janner had announced he intends to remain in the House of Lords:

"So we have a situation where Lord Janner cannot put before the law, but can remain a legislator. The public won’t accept that. And I have to ask – did Alison Saunders consider that as part of the decision?"

The letter in the Times, organised by Mr Danczuk, said the public will see the decision from Alison Saunders as "a whitewash". 

The signatories, who include Conservatives Zac Goldsmith and Nadine Dorries, said the peer's ill health "cannot be a barrier to the greater public interest".