Menu
Sat, 15 June 2024

Newsletter sign-up

Subscribe now
The House Live All
Global Plastics Treaty - the 4th round of negotiations and how we ‘Bridge to Busan’ Partner content
Environment
Time to break down the barriers stalling water efficient housing Partner content
Environment
Environment
Environment
Environment
Press releases

Global Plastic Policy Centre launches resource to track progress on once-in-a-generation plastic treaty

Revolution Plastics Institute

3 min read Partner content

The University of Portsmouth has launched a new resource designed to help anyone interested in keeping up with the plastics treaty process.

 The Global Plastic Policy Centre (GPPC) at the University of Portsmouth has launched a new resource designed to help anyone interested in keeping up with the plastics treaty process. The Centre has been closely following the progress of the International Legally Binding Instrument (ILBI) that was agreed upon at the fifth United Nations Environment Assembly (UNEP) in Nairobi in March 2022. 

The ILBI is a landmark resolution that aims to end plastic pollution and is being developed through negotiations between 200 UN member states.  The GPPC’s new resource is intended to provide a comprehensive overview of the complex treaty process, including the latest news, analysis, and key documents.   The negotiations are expected to take just over two years with the final draft ready by the end of 2024.  The journey to get there includes five intergovernmental negotiating committees as well as regional stakeholder consultations.  

We recognised that there was a real need for a centralised resource to help people stay up-to-date with the plastics treaty process. 

Professor Steve Fletcher, Director of the Global Plastics Policy Centre at the University of Portsmouth

Professor Steve Fletcher, Director of the Global Plastics Policy Centre at the University of Portsmouth says: “We recognised that there was a real need for a centralised resource to help people stay up-to-date with the plastics treaty process.  As a leading institution in the field of plastics policy research, we felt it was our responsibility to create an independent platform that would help to promote greater understanding and engagement around this critical issue”.

The GPPC’s new resource is available on its website and includes an interactive timeline of the treaty process, summaries of key developments, expert analysis, and links to relevant documents and resources.  The platform is designed to be accessible and user-friendly, with a focus on providing accurate and reliable information that is relevant to a wide range of stakeholders.  

The treaty is a once-in-a-generation opportunity to bring about real change.

Antaya March , Research Lead, Global Plastics Policy Centre

Antaya March, Research Lead, Global Plastics Policy Centre says: “We hope that this resource will be a valuable tool for policymakers, journalists, businesses and anyone else who wants to stay informed about the plastics treaty process. By providing a clear and comprehensive overview of the negotiations and the issues at stake, we hope to demystify what can seem like a complicated process.  The treaty is a once-in-a-generation opportunity to bring about real change.” 

Through the Revolution Plastics initiative, the University of Portsmouth is committed to addressing the root causes of plastic pollution.  It aims to develop evidence-based solutions to the plastic pollution crisis through multidisciplinary research, policy engagement and public outreach.  

To access the Global Plastics Policy Centre’s new resource on the international legally binding instrument to end plastic pollution, please visit https://plasticspolicy.port.ac.uk/international-legally-binding-instrument/ 

Categories

Environment
Associated Organisation