Government must act to develop effective regulation on species trade and movements

Posted On: 
5th September 2019

Resilience to disease is also partly underpinned by biodiversity; in the genetic variation of forest trees, tree species’ diversity or the structural diversity of forest stands, both below and above ground. The evidence is clear in concluding that the capacity of forests to resist threats is in large part dependent on biodiversity at multiple scales, Woodland Trust.

The Government must act to develop effective regulation on species trade and movements, and to implement rapid detection and response mechanisms.  As an island nation, reliant on international trading links, it’s imperative that we, and our global partners, act now. Prevention is far cheaper than a cure. Recent research shows that ash dieback is predicted to kill up to 95% of ash trees and cost £15 billion.

In addition to reducing the risk of introducing further pests on imports, natural regeneration underpins native woodland resilience. Our native trees have an extraordinary genetic diversity, which is going to be fundamental to their future adaptation potential. Natural regeneration can drive rapid adaption in response to threats over short timescales through genetic mixing. However, deer browsing and lack of management is preventing this from occurring in many cases and needs to be addressed.

Resilience to disease is also partly underpinned by biodiversity; in the genetic variation of forest trees, tree species’ diversity or the structural diversity of forest stands, both below and above ground. The evidence is clear in concluding that the capacity of forests to resist threats is in large part dependent on biodiversity at multiple scales.