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YouGov snap poll reveals public support for Labour broadband policy

YouGov snap poll reveals public support for Labour broadband policy
2 min read

A snap poll has found the majority of British people approve of Labour’s plans to roll out free broadband to all UK homes and businesses by 2030.



 


A YouGov poll, consisting of 3,653 British adults, found six in 10 (62%) supported such a move, almost three times as many people as were opposed (22%). 

The polling firm found support was strongest among those who voted Labour at the 2017 election, with 79% backing the proposal. The same applied for 62% of those who had voted Lib Dem. 

Among Conservative voters the proposal received a mixed reaction, with 45% pro and 41% against. 

However, when it comes to how Labour intends to deliver free broadband, by nationalising BT Openreach, Britons were much less assured. 

Just under a third (32%) supported this part of the plan, with a similar number (31%) opposed. 

Both groups were outnumbered by those who said they “don’t know” how they feel about it. 

Once again, 2017 Labour voters were more likely to support, with a small majority of 54% in favour and 15% opposed. 

Among Conservative voters, however, the figures were almost completely reversed: 15% pro and 53% against. 

By comparison, Lib Dem voters backed the measure by 40% to 29%. 

Labour previously promised to nationalise parts of BT Openreach, which runs much of the existing digital network, to create a new British Broadband public service if it wins the general election.

Tech giants such as Amazon, Facebook and Google would be taxed to help pay for the multi-billion pound policy.

Communities with the worst broadband access would benefit first from the new policy, which Labour say will save the average consumer £30.30 a month.

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