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Tool theft affects 8 in 10 builders, finds FMB

Federation of Master Builders

2 min read

More than three-quarters of Britain’s builders have been victims of tool theft, with some having lost more than £20,000 worth of tools in the past ten years, according to new research by the Federation of Master Builders (FMB).


Key results from the FMB’s research into tool theft reveal:

• More than three quarters (83%) of UK builders have had their tools stolen.

• More than one in three incidents involved theft from vans (38%) and theft from sites (34%). 7% of incidents saw tools stolen from a shed or garage at home, and 3% of incidents saw tools stolen from inside the home.

• Of builders who had tools stolen in the past ten years (78%), the most common value of loss was £2,500. One in ten builders said that they had at least £10,000 worth of tools stolen, and 2% said they had at least £20,000.

• When asked how many working days builders had lost to tool theft over the past ten years, one in three builders (29%) said one to two working days and 16% said two to five working days. 7% of builders said they had lost five working days or more.

• Over a 40-year working life, a builder will typically lose £10,000 worth of tools and 6 working days to tool theft.

• Tool theft is taking its toll on builders’ mental health, causing 15% of builders to suffer from anxiety, one in ten builders (11%) to suffer from depression and some reported experiences of panic attacks and suicidal thoughts.

Brian Berry, Chief Executive of the FMB, said: “Decisive action is needed to tackle tool theft. Eight in ten builders report that they have had tools stolen before. This is causing mental health issues amongst builders with reports of depression, anxiety, anger, frustration, stress and even suicidal thoughts. The Government needs to look into tool theft and consider the need for the introduction of tighter regulations around selling second-hand tools, and greater minimum fines for those convicted of tool theft.” 

Berry concluded: “Builders need to take extra steps to reduce the risk of theft by bringing tools inside at night, installing extra locks in the van, marking tools with an address or phone number, and painting them a special colour. Builders should also check their insurance policies to see what they have covered. Websites are available where tool serial numbers can be registered for extra piece of mind when it comes to making a claim on insurance. Tool theft is not a victimless crime and stronger government action is needed to help tackle this growing problem.”

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